Cyprus


Broken Europe

Posted on April 27th, by Global Tax Weekly in Banking, Budgets, IMF, Individual Taxation. No Comments

A fall in average deficits in the Eurozone and the European Union in 2013 sounds like good news, but lift the hood and the picture is not so pretty. Total debt in the Eurozone (17 countries) increased to 92.6 percent of gross domestic product from 90.7 percent in 2012, ever further above the European Union’s Maastricht limit of 60 percent. For the whole EU, debt increased from 85.2 percent of GDP to 87.1 percent. Obviously these figures reflect a mismatch between income and expenditure. It’s not however the case that public expenditure increased everywhere: although in France public spending reached a record 57.1 percent of GDP, overall EU public spending fell marginally to just less than 50 percent. Alongside increases in debt, the falls in deficits merely testify to a concomitant increase in tax revenues which ate into the gap … Read More »


Be Careful Where You Die

Posted on March 12th, by Global Tax Weekly in Individual Taxation, Inheritance Tax, International Taxation. No Comments

Common sense you surely needn’t look for in the European inheritance tax labyrinth, demonstrated this week by the latest twist in the French/Swiss farrago. I’m not even going to try to opine on the combatants’ positions. It’s obvious to everyone (me, that is) that inheritance tax ought to be abolished. It’s immoral to tax money that has already been taxed; and it’s doubly immoral to get in the way of inter-generational transfers. The relationship between parents and children is fraught enough already without government stepping between them. Of course it cuts in all sorts of unexpected directions: Joe hopes that his Dad’s first wife, Isobel, dies before his Dad does (bad); but he hopes that his Dad outlives her (good); but his step-sister Madeleine is conflicted because she stands to get more through her mother’s will than directly from her … Read More »


Malta In The Crosshairs

Posted on March 9th, by Global Tax Weekly in Banking, Budgets, Corporation Tax, E-commerce, Individual Taxation, OECD, Offshore. No Comments

As usual during this period of fiscal stress for countries across the world, we look in vain for any cuts in taxes. But at least in Malta they are trying to improve matters for businesses through simplification of the tax system and throttling back the impositions of government. As I say that, I can already hear the offended wailings of the anti-brigade: oh, but Malta is offshore, it is a tax haven, it steals revenue from big “respectable” countries like Germany by helping banks and gaming companies with low tax rates, so that they can’t get the revenue to help their poor, huddled masses to survive the rigors of the nuclear winter we are all trying to survive. Let’s be clear: the “nuclear winter” is a direct result of the debts taken on by those countries’ politicians in pursuit of … Read More »


Cyprus Keeps Punching

Posted on January 6th, by Global Tax Weekly in International Taxation, Offshore, Real Estate. No Comments

Cyprus has put five new double tax agreements into effect, including, importantly, one with the Ukraine, which includes beneficial treatment for real estate owned through a Cyprus holding company. The country’s DTA with Russia used to include such treatment, but the Protocol signed a year ago imposed limits on real estate holding companies, albeit only coming into effect in 2017. Although Cyprus has come in for a great deal of negative publicity since the “bail-in” imposed on bank depositors by the Troika earlier in 2013, it maintains an extremely tax-friendly environment for international holding companies, and double tax treaties are a key element of this regime, along with its 12.5 percent corporation tax rate and favorable rules on dividends and royalties. As a tax-friendly hub for investment into the European Union, Cyprus ranks alongside Ireland and Malta. Although the Government … Read More »


The Tortoise And The Hare

Posted on October 16th, by Global Tax Weekly in E-commerce. No Comments

For the European countries which used to make some or all of their living from being “low-tax,” which does of course include Switzerland, the EU has always been the elephant in the room, and if Switzerland may by now regret having been ambivalent towards the EU, some other countries which threw in their lot more whole-heartedly with the EU have met with unexpected outcomes. In the case of Cyprus, the initial EU-induced boom has turned to ashes in its mouth; but Malta seems to have gotten everything right, and is carefully building itself into a diversified financial services and e-commerce centre. Its latest wheeze is to create a secondary stock market designed to attract smaller, more entrepreneurial companies; technically it will be known as a Multilateral Trading Facility under the country’s investment legislation. Jersey and Guernsey have shown what can … Read More »





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