November2018


Canada In A Tax Quandary

Posted on November 30th, by Global Tax Weekly in Corporation Tax. No Comments

Canada has been studying the US tax reforms and their potential impact on the Canadian business environment, economy, and investment since the start of the year. This indicates that it is clearly worried about the possible erosive effect they will have on Canada’s competitiveness.

However, while it was never likely that a Canadian Government that has accorded a high priority to tax fairness was going to match the US corporate tax cut dollar for dollar, business will be forgiven for not getting very excited about the outcome of the Finance Department’s review: new write-off incentives and an investment incentive.

Under the proposals, the Government will allow the full cost of machinery and equipment used in the manufacturing and processing of goods to be written off immediately for tax purposes. Immediate expensing will apply to qualifying assets acquired after November 20, 2018. It … Read More »


French Tax Authorities To Scan Social media

Posted on November 22nd, by Global Tax Weekly in Tax Avoidance. No Comments

Long gone are the days of invisible ink, candlesticks in libraries, and paper trails. Now the trail that many an investigator must follow, including those detecting for tax evasion, is digital. Indeed, unless you are completely off-grid, it’s probably nigh-on impossible not to leave digital finger and footprints all over the place without even realizing it.

Social media is becoming something of a treasure trove for those looking for people with hidden secrets. Or not so secret secrets, as the case may be. And again, this is a platform that is becoming very useful to the tax man. This was highlighted by French Budget Minister Gerard Darmanin’s announcement last week that the tax authorities will soon begin trawling through peoples’ social media accounts looking for signs that one’s lifestyle doesn’t quite match the humble income declared on one’s tax return. Well, … Read More »


Estonia Quick To Ignore Tax Debts

Posted on November 14th, by Global Tax Weekly in Corporation Tax. No Comments

According to a recent ruling by Estonia’s Supreme Court, the country’s tax agency can no longer chase up tax debts that are owed five years after enforcement proceedings are initiated. Well, it’s a good job that tax debts aren’t waived so quickly in many other jurisdictions, given the often protracted nature of tax audits and investigations.

It emerged just last week that the average length of tax inquiries into large businesses in the United Kingdom are now taking more than three years to settle, with each case taking around 39 months to resolve in 2017/18, up from 34 months in 2016/17, according to Pinsent Masons, the law firm. Of course, this isn’t just hard luck for the tax authority. It’s very unfortunate for the businesses facing these interminably long investigative proceedings too.

As Pinsent Masons pointed out, these matters are not only … Read More »


UK Budget To Introduce Digital Services Tax

Posted on November 7th, by Global Tax Weekly in Budgets. No Comments

Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond has apparently acquired the nickname in parliamentary circles of “Spreadsheet Phil.” This is suggestive of a man who likes to play around with numbers. A lot. Not the best company at parties, perhaps. A meticulous planner maybe, not given to spontaneous policy announcements. Except that he kind of is. His first Budget as Chancellor was marked by dramatic about-turn on self-employment taxation, and his latest Budget, announced October 30, by a digital services tax, set to commence in 2020. Incidentally, Hammond moved Budget day forward by one day so it wouldn’t be announced on October 31 – Halloween – and suffer a pun-fest at the hands of the media. As it turned out, the 2018 Budget was largely free from tax horrors. But many businesses will surely have been a least a little bit … Read More »





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