Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS)


Few Companies Planning For BEPS

Posted on December 23rd, by Global Tax Weekly in Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS). No Comments

In general, governments are continuing to move quickly in the area of taxation in the era of BEPS. Yet, a survey conducted by financial advisory firm Grant Thornton earlier this year found that the OECD BEPS project has had little impact on the way companies plan their tax affairs. As many as 78 percent of businesses have not changed their business’s approach to taxation, the survey, published in September, found, despite more than 80 countries having agreed to adopt at least the minimum elements of the BEPS Action Plan at that point.

Why should this be the case, when companies around the world are experiencing an unprecedented level of change and uncertainty? Well, the key word it seems is uncertainty. When you are uncertain of the right way to go to get to your preferred destination, and someone keeps redrawing the … Read More »


Germany Goes Against The Grain

It was encouraging to see German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble rebelling against European Commission proposals for public country-by-country reporting at the latest meeting of EU finance ministers, given the weight of Germany’s voice in the EU. It’s going against the grain these days to question the call for greater corporate transparency. And perhaps there’s an argument that multinational firms could benefit from being more open about their activities from a public relations point of view, in much the same way as offshore jurisdictions like Guernsey have. Yet, as Schäuble suggested, there has to be a balance between “transparency and practicality.”

As Schäuble pointed out to his counterparts in Brussels recently, publishing sensitive company information in the public domain could lead to all sorts of unintended consequences, such as “lining someone up to be pilloried publicly.”

For more information on this, … Read More »


BEPS Roadmap Muddies Dutch Waters

The European Council, with the Netherlands at the presidency helm, last month released its BEPS Roadmap for the short and medium term. It lays out plans for further work on the Interest and Royalties Directive to include further restrictions on interest deductions, and on the Anti Avoidance Directive, with key focus on tightening controlled foreign company rules across the EU. This is perhaps an uncomfortable position for the Netherlands to be in; during much of the BEPS initiative, it remained largely silent on the proposals being put forward, choosing to wait for recommendations. And while it has made a few changes to its laws to reflect certain BEPS developments, in part in line with EU requirements, the Netherlands has not done so with the sheer gusto demonstrated by, say, the UK.

For more information on this, and other topical international tax … Read More »


EU Anti-Avoidance Moves Concentrate US Minds

It would be somewhat remiss not to mention the latest battery of anti-corporate tax avoidance proposals from the European Commission, especially as they represent probably the most serious attempt by Brussels so far to harmonize corporate tax in the EU. Indeed, even the most europhile member states in the heart of “old Europe” (France, Germany, Benelux et al) must have been taken by surprise by the ferocity of the Commission’s recent attacks on member states’ tax regimes. But, rather than do the predictable thing of chastening Brussels for its latest power grab over the tax sovereignty of European nations, it is possible look at this from a different angle. If there’s one good thing to come out of the EU’s aggressive stance on tax avoidance, it’s that minds are beginning to focus on tax reform on the other side of … Read More »


Crown Dependencies Still Going Strong

Posted on January 18th, by Global Tax Weekly in Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS). No Comments

BEPS may be changing the international tax landscape irrevocably – whether for better or worse being a matter of intense debate – but the allure of offshore and low-tax financial centers remains as strong as ever. For example, the little island of Guernsey, which at just 78 square kilometers in area is over half the size of Washington DC, is now home to more non-UK entities listed on the London Stock Exchange than any other jurisdiction globally. In fact, the UK Crown Dependencies (Guernsey, Jersey, and the Isle of Man) all play a hugely important role in funneling investment into the capital markets of London, and the wider economy of the UK. One-third of the Chinese companies listed on London’s Alternative Investment Market (AIM) were incorporated in Jersey in 2014, up from one-quarter prior to 2008. LSE data also shows … Read More »


“Extreme Disappointment”

Posted on October 12th, by Global Tax Weekly in Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS), OECD. No Comments

It is claimed that the BEPS project is a global initiative, built on a worldwide consensus of OECD and G20 members, and other key economies. That’s true to the extent that these countries are regularly heard to pay lip service to the work of the OECD in all its anti-tax avoidance endeavors. But when you look a little closer, there are stark similarities between the OECD’s work and Europe’s vision of what worldwide corporate taxation should look like. Perhaps this is not surprising, as, after all, the OECD and its 2,500-strong team of technocrats, administrators, and academics are based in Paris. Indeed, Pascal Saint-Amans, one of the main supervisors of the BEPS project, is a former French civil servant. And the fact that 25 of the 34 OECD member countries are in Europe will naturally give much of the OECD’s … Read More »


Filled With Jargon, Official-Speak And Complex Tax Concepts

Posted on October 7th, by Global Tax Weekly in Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS), OECD. No Comments

Apparently, the numerous consultations that the OECD undertook with businesses and other stakeholders as part of the BEPS project generated some 12,000 pages of comment. I do wonder, however, how much of this verbiage the OECD actually took on board when formulating the final BEPS reports, which were announced, in that most modern of ways, via a webcast from OECD HQ in Paris, on October 5.

In reality, the content of the 15 reports, filled as they are with jargon, official-speak and complex tax concepts, is what most of us were expecting. What’s really quite worrying me is that the OECD seems to be utterly in denial that the BEPS recommendations, when (and if) implemented, could do any harm to businesses, investment, and economies. Indeed, I was astonished to hear Saint-Amans admit in his presentation that more double taxation is … Read More »


Well done, Singapore…

Posted on May 4th, by Global Tax Weekly in Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS), OECD. No Comments

…for suggesting that the OECD’s focus with its BEPS project is almost entirely focused on “harmful” tax practices to the point where the beneficial ones have been forgotten about. It sounds – in the spirit of one of John Cleese’s characters again – like stating the bleedin’ obvious, but it’s about time somebody did. Of course, from the OECD’s point of view, I suppose that’s the whole ethos of The Project: the elimination of tax competition. Not that you’ll hear such an admission from the mouth of Angel Gurria or the finance ministers of the OECD governments who regularly praise the work of the OECD without ever seeming to question it. If they ever did stop to think what they are about to unleash on the world, perhaps they might begin to have second thoughts. Then again, politicians generally are … Read More »


A “Fair” Share

If overbearing tax and regulation are still somewhat alien to the American way of life, the same cannot be said for the European Union, where companies and individuals must by now be well used to governments taking what they think is a “fair” share of their income (i.e. over half of it in many instances), and generally interfering in the lives of taxpayers. And so it goes on. The European Commission’s latest wheeze is its corporate tax plan, which it claims would be “a revolutionary step” towards international tax transparency and the fight against base erosion and profit shifting. The gruesome details of the Action Plan won’t be published until summer, but we’ve been warned to expect the controversial plans for a common consolidated corporate tax base to rear their ugly head again. Essentially though, the corporate tax plan is … Read More »





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